Tagged Facebook photos help cops nab partying burglars

Tagged Facebook photos help cops nab partying burglars

Dianne Gallagher, reporting for NBC Charlotte, tells us to remember to
be careful what we post online. Social networking site Facebook is playing
more and more of a role in creating evidence for use in all sorts of cases.
In one case, some young students might face
burglary charges after breaking into a home and partying there while the family was away
on vacation.

The kids thought they covered their tracks. The only thing out of place,
according to the homeowner, was a dented window screen. Everything else
was just fine, because the kids came back the next day, after the party,
and cleaned everything up. They even did the dishes. The homeowner hadn’t
a clue what had happened.

But tagged Facebook photos show a completely different story, including
a boy throwing up in the kitchen sink and another sitting shirtless on
the homeowner’s son’s bed. Had it not been for bragging, said
the homeowner, and the tagged photos (which the police are using to identify
suspects), no one likely would ever have been caught.

In Maryland, breaking and entering into a residence is a felony charge.
A burglary conviction could result in serious consequences for these young
students (classmates of the homeowner’s children), including a criminal
record for potential employers to see.